Life as a Police Constable

Being a Police Constable isn't an easy option. But it is one of the most varied, challenging and rewarding careers you could choose.

Meet and Engage Online Forum

We will be holding Meet and Engage online forums during the New Police Constable recruitment campaign. During these there'll be 2 Police Constables and 2 Recruitment Officers available to answer any questions you may have whether it's in relation to working for the Met Police or questions about the recruitment process itself.

The Meet and Engage online forum is a fantastic opportunity to put to rest any doubts you might have about pursuing this line of work. Whether it's the physical fitness, working hours, potential dangers, our Police Constables will be able to address any concerns. And, hopefully, by the end of the forum you'll see just how exciting and invaluable the role will be.

If you're interested in participating in a Meet and Engage online forum, please check this page for updates on how to register for the next one.

Register

We look forward to speaking to you then.

angle

Stopping
Crime

  • STOPPING CRIME

    As a Police Constable you never know what's round the corner. From rushing to a reported incident to chasing a suspect, it can be exciting, exhilarating and constantly challenging.

    You're facing up to the kind of situations you won't find in any other role - and sometimes those can be unexpected situations that can really get the adrenaline pumping. And all the time you're supported by a team of equally committed people, helping to protect communities from the effects of crime. Here are just some of the duties you could find yourself undertaking:

    • Supporting/interviewing victims and witnesses
    • Apprehending, arresting and interviewing suspects
    • Giving talks on crime prevention
    • Attending emergency calls
    • Dealing with anti-social behaviour
    • Engaging with young people at risk of falling in to crime
    • Mediating in arguments and confrontations
    • Investigating reported crimes
    • Collecting evidence at crime scenes
    • Dealing with road accidents and incidents
    • Assisting paramedics and fire & rescue crews
    • Tackling drunk and dangerous driving
    • Responding to domestic violence reports.
  • PREPARED FOR ANYTHING

    Join us as a Police Constable and you'll face a wide variety of challenges every day. That's why your training will cover everything from how to deal effectively with members of the public to self defence. It's a process designed to ensure you're always up-to-date with the skills and knowledge you need to become an effective officer.

    After your basic training, you won't just be out patrolling the streets of London on your own. You'll spend your first few weeks as a probationary Police Constable working with at least one experienced officer who will act as a coach and mentor, ensuring you get the chance to practice important skills such as dealing with the public, investigating crimes and booking a suspect into custody.

  • BEING A POLICE CONSTABLE

    Being a Police Constable means never knowing what's going to happen next. You'll be working long hours - typically 8, 10 or 12-hour shifts - you'll be in contact with the widest variety of people, and you'll be expected to act with integrity at all times - even when you're out of uniform.

    At the same time, it's a role that can give you some of the best and proudest days of your life. From protecting the vulnerable and saving lives to just making your local community feel safer, it's exciting, diverse and vitally important.

    Are you eligible?

    The nature and responsibilities of policing mean there are certain things that determine whether you can become a Police Constable. These cover areas such as age, criminal convictions, and nationality, how long you've lived in London, if you have any tattoos, and your eyesight and general health. Check the eligibility requirements page to find out if you can apply to become one of our Police Constables.

    Fit for duty

    Naturally, you also need a reasonable level of fitness. That doesn't mean we look for Olympic athletes - please take a look at our fitness requirements to find out what this involves.

Met Police angle

Working with the community

Working with London's communities is one of the most important aspects of life as a Police Constable. It makes a massive difference to community relations and crime prevention when constables are recognised and respected in their local communities.

You'll be working closely with local people, schools, businesses and community groups, to help ensure that everyone feels protected from crime and the effects of crime. This is why it's vital that you can understand, empathise and work with a range of communities - and communicate with people from different backgrounds and walks of life.


Some of our officers describe why serving communities is important to them.

  • Met Police - Serving Communities
  • Met Police - Serving Communities
  • Met Police - Serving Communities
  • Met Police - Serving Communities
  • Met Police - Serving Communities

Read about the difference our officers make to London's communities on a daily basis:

  • "We want to express our gratitude to you both for a rapid response and initial investigation... you were courteous, compassionate and professional. Your empathy at the scene was very much appreciated."


    From a victim of burglary

  • "They go beyond the line of duty when it comes to supporting the community... and should be rewarded for the empathy and care they approach their work with."


    From a resident subject to intimidation

  • "I realise that for them it was a routine incident but for my father and for me, it was anything but. Thank you for your kindness, sensitivity and professionalism. It made a huge difference."


    From the son of a dementia sufferer who was missing

  • "They were simply magnificent and so caring. At all times your staff were kind, considerate and most sensitive. They supported me extremely well and more importantly from my point of view, comforted my wife who was extremely worried."


    From victim of a serious assault

  • "You and your colleagues at the Met Police have been outstanding in your support to us, providing regular communication on the progress of the case and giving reassurance throughout. We are immensely grateful to you all for this."


    From a victim of burglary

  • "My sincere thanks to all your officers who attended the horrific incident. They all did a superb, professional job with the utmost kindness and consideration."


    From a witness to a serious assault and robbery

  • "We wanted you to be aware and proud of these exceptional officers and what they have done for us and our daughter. I take every opportunity to tell anybody around us what a great job the police did that day."


    From the parents of a victim of domestic abuse

  • "They could not have been more helpful and kind. It had been a traumatic experience for me that was turned into a rewarding one by their kindness and help."


    An older man who needed assistance

  • "They treated my mother with great care, empathy and respect. I am full of admiration for the kindness shown that day."


    From the daughter of a robbery victim

  • "Please pass on our enormous gratitude for his help and calmness on a wet, cold and very scary evening for us all. His kindest act was reassuring my eight your old son."


    From a victim of a road traffic accident


  • Being a Police Constable in the community

    The Met polices one of the world's most vibrant and diverse cities. This means we need people who can work positively with a wide variety of people and communities. These are the kind of community policing duties where your skills and personality will prove invaluable:

    • Giving talks in schools and community settings
    • Building links with religious and community leaders, the council and NHS, other emergency services and charities and voluntary sector groups
    • Meeting with the owners of local shops and businesses
    • Mediating in arguments and disputes between local residents
    • Engaging with young people at risk of falling in to crime
    • Tackling the causes and effects of anti-social behaviour.
  • Are you eligible?

    The nature and responsibilities of policing mean there are certain things that determine whether you can become a Police Constable. These cover areas such as age, criminal convictions, and nationality, how long you've lived in London, if you have any tattoos, and your eyesight and general health. Check the eligibility requirements page to find out if you can apply to become one of our Police Constables.

  • Fit for duty

    Naturally, you also need to be reasonably fit. That doesn't mean you need to be an Olympic athlete. Take a look at our fitness requirements to find out what this involves.

A respected
career

Joining the Met as a new Police Constable is just the beginning of the journey - this could be the start of a long and varied career.

During your two year probationary period, you'll be working alongside experienced officers and gaining a wide range of practical, on-the-job knowledge. It's the kind of foundation that will stand you in good stead for the rest of your police career. Once you've completed your probation, and your appointment as a Police Constable has been confirmed, you'll then have plenty of opportunities to continue your professional development. This could take you in any number of career directions, like detective roles, child protection, firearms, dog and mounted units, fraud or cybercrime.

As the UK's largest police service, the Met also has a variety of specialist teams that you won't find anywhere else, from counter-terrorism to diplomatic protection and air support. With competitive salaries, excellent benefits and continuous support, it all adds up to an enjoyable and rewarding career.


A lasting and varied career

  • Probation

    Your first two years will be a probationary period.

    Over the two years you'll build your knowledge and gain confidence in your ability as a Police Constable. During the probationary period, you'll continue to be assessed and supported so that by the end of the two years you've developed the skills you need and are ready to work on your own. That's when you'll be recommended for confirmation of appointment.

  • An on-going career

    On appointment as a Police Constable you'll have the option to build your experience in community policing or move into a variety of roles including specialist teams, however these options depend on which teams have vacancies. And, of course, you'll have to prove you have the skills and potential they're looking for - whether that's for dog handling, traffic, schools teams, firearms, mounted police, Criminal Investigation Department (CID), cybercrime, child protection or one of hundreds of other career possibilities. There may also be opportunities to try for promotion if you're keen to climb the ranks.


Career Timelines

In the timelines below some of our Officers talk about the direction they have taken their career with the Met.

Inspector Tony Oram

Inspector Tony Oram's broad experience as a PC and Sergeant provided the ideal foundation for his current role. Here's a brief overview of his career to date.

Chief Superintendent Mickey Gallagher

Chief Superintendent Mickey Gallagher's Met career has seen him travel the world on the journey from PC to the senior ranks.

Police Constable Chris Excell

Police Constable Chris Excell's experience as a Constable has seen him deal with a huge variety of crimes and incidents.

Police Constable Diane Vincent

Police Constable Diane Vincent's career story to date shows the breadth of community focused roles available to Constables.

  • Inspector Tony Oram's broad experience as a PC and Sergeant provided the ideal foundation for his current role. Here's a brief overview of his career to date.

    Inspector Tony Oram

    Inspector Tony Oram's broad experience as a PC and Sergeant provided the ideal foundation for his current role. Here's a brief overview of his career to date.

    Pre - Met

    Worked as a Bank Clerk after leaving school. Interest in police is inspired after branch is held up by armed robbers.

    1988

    Joins the Met aged 19. Completes probation at Gypsy Hill and Streatham, South London

    Early 90's

    Frontline uniformed policing on the streets of Streatham.

    Regularly undertakes plain clothes work to support CID operations.

    Appears in crime reconstructions on TV show Police 5.

    "In those days, they didn't use actors. We had to do it ourselves."

    Mid 90's

    Two years on the Vice Squad tackling prostitution in Streatham.

    Leaves Vice Squad after passing advanced driving courses. Takes the wheel of an Area Car, dealing with a huge diversity of incidents and crimes.

    Maintains Public Order training throughout career to date. Polices football matches and numerous major events.

    Late 90's - early 2000's

    Joins the Robbery Task Force - works across Lambeth Borough to prevent and foil street robberies, often involving armed criminals.

    2003

    Decides to seek promotion to Sergeant. Passes exams and takes up uniformed role in Wimbledon.

    Takes Town Centre Sergeant role.

    Gains broad experience in Response team and as a Custody Sergeant and a Controller (managing incoming incident calls).

    Runs shoplifting squad, dedicated to reducing crime in Wimbledon.

    Works annually at Wimbledon tennis tournament, with a focus on tackling ticket touts. Directly involved in planning policing of the event.

    Takes opportunities to 'act up' and demonstrate ability to lead teams of 20, 30 and more officers.

    "The Met is a place where you can do almost whatever you want, providing you build up the evidence to show your capabilities and potential."

    Passes Inspector exams.

    2012 to present

    Appointed as Inspector in the Response Team at Brixton.

    Leads a uniformed team of 50. Responsible for people and business management, in addition to frontline policing.

    "There are so many different opportunities. I would recommend the Met to anyone."

  • Chief Superintendent Mickey Gallagher's Met career has seen him travel the world on the journey from PC to the senior ranks.

    Chief Superintendent Mickey Gallagher

    Chief Superintendent Mickey Gallagher's Met career has seen him travel the world on the journey from PC to the senior ranks.

    Pre - Met

    Worked as Lab technician at Southwark College. Trained in photography and graphics, with initial aim of joining the BBC.

    1984

    Decides to join another national institution, the Met. Completes probation in Bexleyheath/East Dulwich.

    Undertakes Public Order training. During probation, polices major events including Miner's Strike and Broadwater Farm riots.

    1986

    Appointed as a PC. Works in frontline policing in the streets of South London through the late 80's.

    1990

    Switches to CID and becomes a Detective Constable at Kings Cross.

    Throughout early 90's, works to clear notorious district of prostitution and dealers, in face of influx of crack cocaine.

    "The Channel Tunnel was being built. Investment was coming into the area. It was an exciting time to police Kings Cross, the place where East End and West End clashed."

    1995

    Promoted to Detective Sergeant and posted to Brixton.

    Works in CID main office and busy Drugs and Firearms team.

    Tackles violent crime on some of the capital's toughest estates and wards.

    1998

    Joins Area Crime Squad, Specialist Crime Directorate based at Scotland Yard.

    "Career progression isn't just about promotion. There are an awful lot of opportunities for lateral development. It affords opportunities to evolve in other ways."

    Part of a team covering the whole of London and working on a national and international basis to tackle organised crime.

    Overseas assignments included anti-mafia operations in Northern Italy and leading an undercover team in Lithuania.

    2005

    Promoted to Detective Inspector and posted to Lambeth.

    Works on CID priorities including child sex abuse, violence against women & girls and drugs & firearms.

    2008

    Promoted to Detective Chief Inspector. Assumes responsibility for the full CID portfolio in Lambeth.

    Seconded to role in the USA. Works with undercover units in Boston and Cincinnati on innovative problem oriented policing initiative aimed at youth gun violence.

    2009

    Brings experience of the US Ceasefire Gun Crime model to the UK and presents it to Association of Chief Police Officers.

    2011

    Promoted to Superintendent and given a hybrid portfolio in Lewisham.

    Runs both uniformed and CID operations for the whole borough.

    Commands operations at events such as football matches and demonstrations, as a member of the Senior Officers Public Order Cadre.

    Acts in an advisory capacity to review and make recommendations to other forces.

    2013 to present

    Promoted to Chief Superintendent. Takes up position of Borough Commander for Brent.

    Responsible for all policing in a borough of 320,000 residents - acts as the public face of the Met in the borough.

    Creates policing strategies that ultimately help local communities to thrive and prosper.

    "In thinking about your future, it's important to have a good idea of where you want to go. You need an actual plan."

  • Police Constable Chris Excell's experience as a Constable has seen him deal with a huge variety of crimes and incidents.

    Police Constable Chris Excell

    Police Constable Chris Excell's experience as a Constable has seen him deal with a huge variety of crimes and incidents.

    Pre - Met

    University student and army reservist.

    2007

    Joins Met after degree. Completes probation in Paddington.

    "Probation gives you a great grounding - and during that time you can visit and consider specialist teams."

    2009

    After appointment, becomes a Neighbourhood Patrol Constable.

    Part of team taking a proactive approach to tackling North Westminster's most active and notorious criminals. Focuses on drug supply and distribution.

    "We were tackling a specific longstanding problem, it was the opportunity to change things for the long-term and leave a legacy".

    2010

    Joins the Territorial Support Group (TSG), the only officers trained in top tier Public Order Policing. Providing 24/7 pan London coverage, TSG is London's first response to any planned or spontaneous events (including public disorder).

    As part of TSG Commissioner's Reserve, attends incidents all over the capital - from evacuating buildings to stopping illegal raves. Also supports local crime initiatives in local boroughs.

    "The variety is practically infinite. One day you could be patrolling Southwark on a street crime initiative, the next you're dealing with a violent suspect over in Iford."

    2014

    On attachment to Communications role at Scotland Yard - following TSG's integration into a new pan - London Taskforce, alongside Air Support, Dog Units, Mounted Branch and Marine Policing.

    Works to improve communication across the different Taskforce units (based in 22 different locations) and with other parts of the Met.

    Works with media and communications department and other divisions to raise public awareness of Taskforce operations and successes.

    2015

    Applied for promotion to Sergeant.

    "There are highs and lows, but performing the role of Police Officer is a privilege - you get to see a side of London that no-one else does."

  • Police Constable Diane Vincent's career story to date shows the breadth of community focused roles available to Constables.

    Police Constable Diane Vincent

    PC Diane Vincent's career story to date shows the breadth of community focused roles available to Constables.

    Pre - Met

    Works in a catering job for Norman Foster's renowned Architecture firm.

    2001

    Joins the Met, having originally seen the PC opportunity advertised in the Job Centre. Completes probation in Lewisham/Brockley.

    2003

    After appointment as a PC, moves to a response policing unit in Deptford.

    Uses language skills to support other boroughs and Police Forces with translation.

    Becomes a Safeguarding Adults from Abuse (SAFA) officer six months after appointment. Works in collaboration with NHS and other organisations.

    Tackles wide-ranging crimes including domestic abuse and sexual offences.

    2005

    Takes on the role of Family Liaison Officer.

    Directly helps the public in many ways, including supporting victims and witnesses before court appearances.

    Informs relatives of bereavements, including those caused by the 7/7 terrorist attacks.

    "Many of my roles have been emotionally demanding and sometimes difficult. But they have been fulfilling and very rewarding. You have to enjoy what you're doing."

    Maintains Public Order training throughout 2004-2009. Polices numerous events including football matches all over London.

    2010

    Moves to a new role, Secondary Schools Officer, in Catford, South London.

    Patrols before and after school, gives crime prevention advice and deals with crimes committed in schools. Carries out weapons sweeps and tackles gang issues. Engages with young people to show them the consequences of crime and gang membership.

    Promotes Police Cadets and Junior Cadets to local young people.

    "I'd do it all over again. And there are so many options for the future. Lots of opportunity. Lots of interesting things to do."

Inspector Tony Oram

  • Met Police - Timelines

    Pre - Met

    Worked as a Bank Clerk after leaving school.
    Interest in police is inspired after branch is held up by armed robbers.

    1988

    Joins the Met aged 19. Completes probation at Gypsy Hill and Streatham, South London.

  • Met Police - Timelines

    Early 90's

    Frontline uniformed policing on the streets of Streatham.

    Regularly undertakes plain clothes work to support CID operations. Appears in crime reconstructions on TV show Police 5.

    "In those days, they didn't use actors. We had to do it ourselves."

  • Met Police - Timelines

    Mid 90's

    Two years on the Vice Squad tackling prostitution in Streatham.

    Leaves Vice Squad after passing advanced driving courses. Takes the wheel of an Area Car,
    dealing with a huge diversity of incidents and crimes.

    Maintains Public Order training throughout career to date.
    Polices football matches and numerous major events.

  • Met Police - Timelines

    Late 90's - early 2000's

    Joins the Robbery Task Force - works across Lambeth Borough to prevent and foil street robberies, often involving armed criminals.

  • Met Police - Timelines

    2003

    Decides to seek promotion to Sergeant. Passes exams and takes up uniformed role in Wimbledon.

    Takes Town Centre Sergeant role. Gains broad experience in Response team and as a Custody Sergeant and a Controller (managing incoming incident calls). Runs shoplifting squad, dedicated to reducing crime in Wimbledon.

    Works annually at Wimbledon tennis tournament, with a focus on tackling ticket touts. Directly involved in planning policing of the event. Takes opportunities to 'act up' and demonstrate ability to lead teams of 20, 30 and more officers.

    "The Met is a place where you can do almost whatever you want, providing you build up the evidence to show your capabilities and potential."

    Passes Inspector exams.

  • Met Police - Timelines

    2012 to present

    Appointed as Inspector in the Response Team at Brixton.

    Leads a uniformed team of 50. Responsible for people and business management, in addition to frontline policing.

    "There are so many different opportunities. I would recommend the Met to anyone."

Chief Superintendent Mickey Gallagher

  • Met Police - Timelines

    Pre - Met

    Worked as Lab technician at Southwark College.
    Trained in photography and graphics, with initial aim of joining the BBC.

  • Met Police - Timelines

    1984

    Decides to join another national institution, the Met.
    Completes probation in Bexleyheath/East Dulwich.

    Undertakes Public Order training. During probation, polices major events
    including Miner's Strike and Broadwater Farm riots.

  • Met Police - Timelines

    1986

    Appointed as a PC. Works in frontline policing in the streets of South London through the late 80's.

  • Met Police - Timelines

    1990

    Switches to CID and becomes a Detective Constable at Kings Cross.

    Throughout early 90's, works to clear notorious district of prostitution and dealers,
    in face of influx of crack cocaine.

    "The Channel Tunnel was being built. Investment was coming into the area.
    It was an exciting time to police Kings Cross, the place where East End and West End clashed."

  • Met Police - Timelines

    1995

    Promoted to Detective Sergeant and posted to Brixton.

    Works in CID main office and busy Drugs and Firearms team.

    Tackles violent crime on some of the capital's toughest estates and wards.

  • Met Police - Timelines

    1998

    Joins Area Crime Squad, Specialist Crime Directorate based at Scotland Yard.

    "Career progression isn't just about promotion.
    There are an awful lot of opportunities for lateral development.
    It affords opportunities to evolve in other ways."

    Part of a team covering the whole of London and working on a national and international basis to tackle organised crime.

    Overseas assignments included anti-mafia operations in Northern Italy and leading an undercover team in Lithuania.

  • Met Police - Timelines

    2005

    Promoted to Detective Inspector and posted to Lambeth.

    Works on CID priorities including child sex abuse, violence against women & girls and drugs & firearms.

  • Met Police - Timelines

    2008

    Promoted to Detective Chief Inspector. Assumes responsibility for the full CID portfolio in Lambeth.

    Seconded to role in the USA. Works with undercover units in Boston and Cincinnati on innovative problem-oriented policing initiative aimed at youth gun violence.

  • Met Police - Timelines

    2009

    Brings experience of the US Ceasefire Gun Crime model to the UK and presents it to Association of Chief Police Officers.

  • Met Police - Timelines

    2011

    Promoted to Superintendent and given a hybrid portfolio in Lewisham.

    Runs both uniformed and CID operations for the whole borough.

    Commands operations at events such as football matches and demonstrations,
    as a member of the Senior Officers Public Order Cadre.

    Acts in an advisory capacity to review and make recommendations to other forces.

  • Met Police - Timelines

    2013 to present

    Promoted to Chief Superintendent. Takes up position of Borough Commander for Brent.

    Responsible for all policing in a borough of 320,000 residents - acts as the public face of the Met in the borough.

    Creates policing strategies that ultimately help local communities to thrive and prosper.

    "In thinking about your future, it's important to have a good idea of where you want to go.
    You need an actual plan."

Police Constable Chris Excell

  • Met Police - Timelines

    Pre - Met

    University student and army reservist.

    2007

    Joins Met after degree. Completes probation in Paddington.

    "Probation gives you a great grounding - and during that time you can visit and consider specialist teams."

  • Met Police - Timelines

    2009

    After appointment, becomes a Neighbourhood Patrol constable.

    Part of team taking a proactive approach to tackling North Westminster's most active and notorious criminals. Focuses on drug supply and distribution.

    "We were tackling a specific longstanding problem, it was the opportunity to change things for the long-term and leave a legacy".

  • Met Police - Timelines

    2010

    Joins the Territorial Support Group (TSG), the only officers trained in top tier Public Order Policing. Providing 24/7 pan London coverage, TSG is London's first response to any planned or spontaneous events (including public disorder).

    As part of TSG Commissioner's Reserve, attends incidents all over the capital - from evacuating buildings to stopping illegal raves. Also supports local crime initiatives in local boroughs.

    "The variety is practically infinite. One day you could be patrolling Southwark on a street crime initiative, the next you're dealing with a violent suspect over in Iford."

  • Met Police - Timelines

    2014

    On attachment to Communications role at Scotland Yard - following TSG's integration into a new pan - London Taskforce, alongside Air Support, Dog Units, Mounted Branch and Marine Policing.

    Works to improve communication across the different Taskforce units (based in 22 different locations) and with other parts of the Met.

    Works with media and communications department and other divisions to raise public awareness of Taskforce operations and successes.

  • Met Police - Timelines

    2015

    Applied for promotion to Sergeant.

    "There are highs and lows, but performing the role of Police Officer is a privilege - you get to see a side of London that no-one else does."

Police Constable Diane Vincent

  • Met Police - Timelines

    Pre - Met

    Works in a catering job for Norman Foster's renowned Architecture firm.

    2001

    Joins the Met, having originally seen the PC opportunity advertised in the Job Centre. Completes probation in Lewisham/Brockley.

  • Met Police - Timelines

    2003

    After appointment as a PC, moves to a response policing unit in Deptford.

    Uses language skills to support other boroughs and Police Forces with translation.

    Becomes a Safeguarding Adults from Abuse (SAFA) officer six months after appointment.
    Works in collaboration with NHS and other organisations.

    Tackles wide-ranging crimes including domestic abuse and sexual offences.

  • Met Police - Timelines

    2005

    Takes on the role of Family Liaison Officer.

    Directly helps the public in many ways, including supporting victims and witnesses before court appearances.

    Informs relatives of bereavements, including those caused by the 7/7 terrorist attacks.

    "Many of my roles have been emotionally demanding and sometimes difficult.
    But they have been fulfilling and very rewarding. You have to enjoy what you're doing."

    Maintains Public Order training throughout 2004-2009.
    Polices numerous events including football matches all over London.

  • Met Police - Timelines

    2010

    Moves to a new role, Secondary Schools Officer, in Catford, South London.

    Patrols before and after school, gives crime prevention advice and deals with crimes committed in schools. Carries out weapons sweeps and tackles gang issues.
    Engages with young people to show them the consequences of crime and gang membership.

    Promotes Police Cadets and Junior Cadets to local young people.

    "I'd do it all over again. And there are so many options for the future. Lots of opportunity.
    Lots of interesting things to do."

Salary & Benefits

Working for the Met as a Police Constable is genuinely rewarding. As well as the rewards you gain from working with different communities and protecting Londoners from crime and the effects of crime, you can also look forward to a wide range of benefits and a competitive salary too.

Salary

As a new Police Constable in the Met, your total starting salary will be £27,153 per annum. This is made up of a basic salary of £20,370 a year, plus London weighting and allowances of £6,783.

After completion of your Certificate in Knowledge of Policing within your initial training period, this will automatically increase to £30,369, made up of a basic salary of £23,586, plus London weighting and allowances of £6,783. If you join us already holding the CKP qualification, then you’ll start on this salary. This rises to a current maximum of £45,933, made up of a basic salary of £39,150, plus London weighting and allowances of £6,783 in line with relevant Home Office guidelines and police regulations

Leave

You'll have 22 days paid annual holiday, rising to 30 days a year depending on your length of service. This is on top of public holidays and an average of two rest days each week.

You can also expect other forms of leave, including maternity, paternity and adoption leave, special leave (with or without pay), parental leave and career breaks of up to five years.

Travel

Whether you're on or off duty, you'll enjoy free travel on London Underground and buses, seven days a week. At the moment, this doesn't extend to overground trains.

Flexible working

We'll always try to take your individual, religious and cultural needs into account so you can fit your work around your personal commitments. But we're an emergency service with a 24/7 responsibility to the people of London, so this may not always be possible.

Pensions

When you start as a new Police Constable, you'll automatically become a member of the New Police Pension Scheme 2015. This is a CARE (Career Average Revalued Earnings) pension scheme which offers a guaranteed pension with an optional lump sum, based on the earnings you receive during your career. The Met and you will contribute and you will receive tax relief on the contributions you make. If you already have a pension it may be possible to transfer this into the police scheme.

Financial Services and Discounts

Metfriendly (Metropolitan Police Friendly Society Limited) offers a variety of financial services, including:

  • Savings products
  • Investment products
  • Protection products
  • Discounts & subsidies.

Many major High Street stores, retail outlets and other national organisations offer discounts and special deals to police officers and many of the Met's sites have subsidised staff restaurants.

Healthcare

You can join our contributory private healthcare scheme and will also benefit from free eye tests and spectacles if you regularly use a computer.

Training & Development

As well as providing a broad range of training and development opportunities, we also offer funding for study towards a professional qualification.

Personal Support & Advice

We pride ourselves on being a caring employer and provide a whole range of support initiatives to help with both you and your family's welfare. These include:

  • Support for employees with caring responsibilities (e.g. flexible working arrangements)
  • Occupational health and welfare counselling (from psychotherapy to financial guidance)
  • Resettlement and outplacement support and services
  • A subsidised convalescence home
  • Holiday play schemes to help with your childcare
  • A network of 'First Contacts' who you can talk to about anything on a one-to-one basis
  • Development and mentoring schemes
  • Membership of the Police Federation and staff support associations to support and represent your needs.

Sports & Social

You, your family and friends will be able to access any number of subsidised leisure and sporting activities.

  • Salary

    As a new Police Constable in the Met, your total starting salary will be £27,153 per annum. This is made up of a basic salary of £20,370 a year, plus London weighting and allowances of £6,783.

    After completion of your Certificate in Knowledge of Policing within your initial training period, this will automatically increase to £30,369, made up of a basic salary of £23,586, plus London weighting and allowances of £6,783. If you join us already holding the CKP qualification, then you’ll start on this salary. This rises to a current maximum of £45,933, made up of a basic salary of £39,150, plus London weighting and allowances of £6,783 in line with relevant Home Office guidelines and police regulations

  • Leave

    You'll have 22 days paid annual holiday, rising to 30 days a year depending on your length of service. This is on top of public holidays and an average of two rest days each week.

    You can also expect other forms of leave, including maternity, paternity and adoption leave, special leave (with or without pay), parental leave and career breaks of up to five years.

  • Travel

    Whether you're on or off duty, you'll enjoy free travel on London Underground and buses, seven days a week. At the moment, this doesn't extend to overground trains.

  • Flexible Working

    We'll always try to take your individual, religious and cultural needs into account so you can fit your work around your personal commitments. But we're an emergency service with a 24/7 responsibility to the people of London, so this may not always be possible.

  • Pensions

    When you start as a new Police Constable, you'll automatically become a member of the New Police Pension Scheme 2015. This is a CARE (Career Average Revalued Earnings) pension scheme which offers a guaranteed pension with an optional lump sum, based on the earnings you receive during your career. The Met and you will contribute and you will receive tax relief on the contributions you make. If you already have a pension it may be possible to transfer this into the police scheme.

  • Financial services and discounts

    Metfriendly (Metropolitan Police Friendly Society Limited) offers a variety of financial services, including:

    • Savings products
    • Investment products
    • Protection products
    • Discounts & subsidies

    Many major High Street stores, retail outlets and other national organisations offer discounts and special deals to police officers and many of the Met's sites have subsidised staff restaurants.

  • Healthcare

    You can join our contributory private healthcare scheme and will also benefit from free eye tests and spectacles if you regularly use a computer.

  • Training & development

    As well as providing a broad range of training and development opportunities, we also offer funding for study towards a professional qualification.

  • Personal support & advice

    We pride ourselves on being a caring employer and provide a whole range of support initiatives to help with both you and your family's welfare. These include:

    • Support for employees with caring responsibilities (e.g. flexible working arrangements)
    • Occupational health and welfare counselling (from psychotherapy to financial guidance)
    • Resettlement and outplacement support and services
    • A subsidised convalescence home
    • Holiday play schemes to help with your childcare
    • A network of 'First Contacts' who you can talk to about anything on a one-to-one basis
    • Development and mentoring schemes
    • Membership of the Police Federation and staff support associations to support and represent your needs.
  • Sports & social

    You, your family and friends will be able to access any number of subsidised leisure and sporting activities.





angle

Met Family Life

Teamwork and a strong sense of trust are at the heart of the Met. Given some of the situations we face every day, this is only natural. It also means that as one of our officers you'll be joining an organisation that supports you in a variety of ways.

Total Support

With one of the biggest teams in the UK alongside you, you'll always have the support you need in your role as a Police Constable, whether from your colleagues or from the range of specialist support and counselling services that we provide. As an employer, we also do all we can to make sure that you're able to balance your personal and professional life.

Of course, we're an emergency service and this means that you'll be expected to work a certain number of unsocial hours, including at night, during weekends and on public holidays. But when we can we'll always try to fit in with your personal, family and religious needs.

Get active

As a Met officer you'll have access to a wealth of sports and social activities - which in many cases will be available to your family too. They provide a great way to enjoy your spare time, make friends and stay in shape.

It will come as no surprise that sports like football, rugby, netball, and hockey are all hugely popular. But you'll be amazed at the sheer variety of different options. There are nearly fifty different sports and social associations - offering everything from fencing and martial arts to mountaineering and motorsport. You could even learn to fly or sail, scuba dive or ski.

Not every activity is all about exertion and adrenaline, though. From darts and snooker to angling and walking to chess and choir singing, there's something for everyone.

We have four excellent sports and social clubs at Bushey in Hertfordshire, Chigwell in Essex, Hayes in Kent and East Molesey in Surrey. These offer great facilities like football, cricket and rugby pitches, tennis courts and athletics tracks.

Met Police angle

Here are some of the sports and social clubs you could get involved with:

  • Team Sports

    Met Police - Team Sports


    • Rugby League
    • Rugby Union Club
    • Netball Club
    • Hockey
    • Ladies Football
    • Ladies Rugby Union
    • Basketball Club
    • Football
    • Volleyball
  • Speed, Strength & Endurance

    Met Police - Speed, Strength & Endurance


    • Athletics Club
    • Triathlon Club
    • Cycling Club
    • Weightlifting
  • Racquet Sports

    Met Police - Raquet Sports


    • Table Tennis
    • Badminton
    • Squash Rackets Club
    • Lawn Tennis
  • Watersports

    Met Police - Watersports


    • Sailing
    • Sub Aqua Club
    • Swimming
    • Water Polo
    • Rowing
  • Adventure
    & Endurance

    Met Police - Team Sports


    • Motor Club
    • Mountaineering Club
    • Ski and Snowboard Club
    • Adventure Racing
    • Riding Club
  • Leisure

    Met Police - Speed, Strength & Endurance


    • Golf
    • Angling Society
    • Walking Club
    • Billiards, Snooker & Pool
    • Bowls
    • Ten Pin Bowling
    • Clay Target Club
  • Martial Arts

    Met Police - Raquet Sports


    • Boxing Club
    • Wrestling
    • Judo Club
    • Fencing
    • Martial Arts
  • Other

    Met Police - Watersports


    • Chess Club
    • Comets Sports & Social
    • Male Voice Choir
    • Life Saving Team

Here are some of the sports and social clubs you could get involved with:

  • Team Sports
    Met Police - Team Sports


    • Rugby League
    • Rugby Union Club
    • Netball Club
    • Hockey
    • Ladies Football
    • Ladies Rugby Union
    • Basketball Club
    • Football
    • Volleyball
  • Speed, Strength & Endurance
    Met Police - Speed, Strength & Endurance


    • Athletics Club
    • Triathlon Club
    • Cycling Club
    • Weightlifting
  • Racquet Sports
    Met Police - Raquet Sports


    • Table Tennis
    • Badminton
    • Squash Rackets Club
    • Lawn Tennis
  • Watersports
    Met Police - Watersports


    • Sailing
    • Sub Aqua Club
    • Swimming
    • Water Polo
    • Rowing
  • Adventure
    & Endurance
    Met Police - Team Sports


    • Motor Club
    • Mountaineering Club
    • Ski and Snowboard Club
    • Adventure Racing
    • Riding Club
  • Leisure
    Met Police - Speed, Strength & Endurance


    • Golf
    • Angling Society
    • Walking Club
    • Billiards, Snooker & Pool
    • Bowls
    • Ten Pin Bowling
    • Clay Target Club
  • Martial Arts
    Met Police - Raquet Sports


    • Boxing Club
    • Wrestling
    • Judo Club
    • Fencing
    • Martial Arts
  • Other
    Met Police - Watersports


    • Chess Club
    • Comets Sports & Social
    • Male Voice Choir
    • Life Saving Team

Barriers to Recruitment
What's Holding You Back?

There are lots of preconceptions about being a Police Constable that might stop you from applying. Here we address some of those:



Met Police - Physical Strength

Working Hours

Policing is a 24/7 business, so you can expect to work shifts including nights and weekends. The nature of the job means some flexibility is required too - you can't suddenly stop pursuing a suspect, just because your official finishing time is reached. The good news is that you'll be advised of your shifts in time to plan ahead. We do try to accommodate staff requests, providing they fit in with operational requirements.

Met Police - Physical Strength

Potential Danger

Policing does sometimes place constables in dangerous situations. However, these are situations you will be incredibly well prepared for - thanks to rigorous initial training, and further instruction throughout your probationary period and beyond. You'll also have the back up of your colleagues at all times. It's a good feeling to know you're part of a team dedicated to supporting each other.

Negative perceptions

We know people are sometimes hesitant about applying because they or their family or friends may have negative perceptions about the police. However it's important to remember the overwhelming majority of officers show the highest standards of integrity and professionalism. By joining us now, you can play your part in continuing that change and building even more confidence in the police.

Met Police - Physical Strength

Social Influencers

It's normal to get career advice from friends or family. Some may be passionate advocates for you joining the police. Others might disapprove of you applying, perhaps because of their own perceptions. It's important to remember our new recruits will play a big part in bringing new ideas and a fresh perspective to our team. Don't discount a police career until you've talked to serving officers about the reality of life in the Met. Serving London as a Police Officer is a job you can be proud to perform - ultimately the decision to apply is yours to take.

Met Police - Physical Strength

Physical Fitness

Don't worry, we're not looking for Olympians to join us. You do need a reasonable level of fitness to be a PC - but our requirements are not nearly as demanding as is often assumed. If you take some form of regular exercise, there should be no issue - plus there are easy ways to prepare if you are not confident in your fitness right now. Look out for tips and advice on this site.

Met Police - Physical Strength

Lengthy Application

The whole recruitment process is longer than for many jobs. But then policing is unlike other jobs�

Met Police - Physical Strength

Fair Treatment

It's a privilege to serve the public. But with that privilege come responsibility and accountability. All of our officers commit to live by our Values and follow a strict Code of Ethics. The overwhelming majority meet the high standards that both the role and the Service demand. Behaviour that falls below those standards is not tolerated, whether that's in the way we treat the public - or our own team.

Equality of opportunity is crucial to building a Met that truly reflects London's population. Everyone deserves a fair chance to prove themselves, develop their career and be part of a Service to take pride in.

Met Police - Lacking Experience

Lacking experience

You don't need any specific work experience to join the Met. People come to us from a huge range of different career backgrounds. The most important thing is that you have the right skills, behaviours and motivations to serve London and its residents. Our training and development will help you make the most of those qualities - and you will be given every opportunity to build up your experience during your probationary period.